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Ada Archive for Department of Defense Service Schools


Ada Courses

Objective: NPS teaches Ada in a number of courses in the software engineering track. Beginning with the second computer science course, software engineering students use Ada in all courses. During the 1993-1994 academic year, Ada 9X features were covered in the Introduction to Software Engineering course. Beginning in January 1995, NPS tentatively plans to require that during their second quarter, computer science students take an object-oriented programming class that uses Ada. NPS graduates between 70 and 80 students each year with a masters of science degree in computer science, and NPS also graduates between 70 and 80 students each year with a masters of science degree in information technology management. NPS students are officers and DoD civilians from all services. For the first programming class, NPS uses the Meridian Ada, MS Windows and DOS, compilers running on PCs. For later classes, NPS migrates to Sun workstations and Meridian Ada, SunAda, Rational Apex, and GNAT compilers.

Concept: Ada 95 Compatible Issue, Management Overview, Object-oriented Design, Software Engineering

Audience: Employee

Background: Computer Scientist, Software Engineer/Developer, System Analyst

Naval Postgraduate School (NPS)
Address: Department of Computer Science, CODE CSDm, 833 Dyer Road, Monterey, CA 93943-5118, USA,
Point of Contact: Commander Mark H. Barber, USN
Phone: (408) 656-2361, DSN 878-2361
Fax: (408) 656-2814


Ada Courses

Objective: Ada is the first language that is taught to USAFA students who are majoring in computer science. Ada is used in all of the core computer science courses, and it is used in a variety of other courses including the software engineering design sequence. Beginning with academic year 1994 1995, freshman planning to major in computer science will be introduced to Ada during a half-semester course. The Department of Astronautics is converting from Pascal or FORTRAN to Ada for astronautics course work. The course work includes 8 10 programs students write while they complete the requirements for their degree. The department has contracted to convert the supporting code for these courses into Ada. Under AJPO sponsorship, the Department of Astronautics intends to convert to Ada by academic Year 1995 1996. For programming in the core courses, the students use both the DOS and Windows versions of the Meridian PC compiler, which is run from a common server in a license manager set up to monitor the number of users. The academy has 50 licenses for each version, which is sufficient for the students enrolled in the core courses. In addition, the GWAda/Ed interpreter is made available to the students to port to their personal PCs, and the SunAda compiler is also available on the UNIX environment that can be accessed through the school's local network. Several students have configured their PCs to run the LINUX operating system and have ported the GNAT 9X compiler to that platform. The Department of Astronautics is surveying environments to determine which to use in 1995.

Concept: Ada 95 Compatible Issue, Design Concepts, Software Engineering

Audience: Employee

Background: Computer Scientist, Software Engineer/Developer, System Analyst

The U.S. Air Force Academy (USAFA)
Address: 2354 Fairchild Hall, Suite 6K41, USAF, CO 80840-6234, USA,
Point of Contact: Lt. Col. Jay Joiner
Phone: (719) 472-3590, DSN 259-3590
Fax: (719) 472-3530


Ada Courses

Objective: Approximately 300 sailors receive training at the Data Processing "A" School each year. The "C" school or advanced training for DP is conducted by the Marine Corps Computer Science School at Quantico. As part of the "A" and "C" school training, an optional computer- aided instruction (CAI) course is available in Ada for anyone who wishes to learn Ada. AETECH's Ada CAI is used.

Concept: Unlisted Lesson(s)

Audience: Employee

Background: Computer Scientist, Software Engineer/Developer, System Analyst

Naval Computer and Telecommunications Command
Address: 4401 Massachusetts Ave., NW, CODE N121, Washington, DC 20394, USA,
Point of Contact: Commander Mader
Phone: (202) 764-2778, DSN 764-2778
Fax: (202) 764-2683


Ada Courses

Objective: Officer training includes a course on programming in Ada and a software engineering course that uses Ada. Support for Ada in the officer curriculum remains constant, and it is expected that the school will convert to Ada 9X sometime during the 1994-1995 academic year. Each year, approximately 250 officers in Specialty 53, who do not already have a master's degree, attend the school for the Systems Automation Officer Training. Officers are given the opportunity to take a 19 day course on Ada programming that covers Ada syntax. The officers also attend a two week course to learn how Ada supports software engineering, and they complete a project using Ada. Also, twice each year, the school offers a one-week introduction to Ada course that anyone working for the DoD may attend. Typically 30 40 people complete this course each time it is offered. The enlisted soldiers course has been converted from an Ada programming language course to a database language programming course. The CS School recently converted from an ALSYS compiler on a mainframe to an AETECH IntegrAda for Windows compiler on 486 PCs in a PC lab.

Concept: Ada 95 Compatible Issue, Software Engineering

Audience: Employee

Background: Computer Scientist, Software Engineer/Developer, System Analyst

Army Computer Science School - Fort Gordon
Address: US Army Signal Center & Fort Gordon, Building 24801, Chamberland Ave., Dixon Hall, Fort Gordon, GA 30905, USA,
Point of Contact: Silvia Mooney
Phone: (706)791-2586, DSN 780-2586
Fax: (706) 791-3235


Ada Courses

Objective: The USNA uses Ada in the software engineering and design courses. The USNA introduces Ada to computer science majors enrolled in the senior software engineering design sequence courses. In the first semester introduction to software engineering course, Ada is used to teach software engineering principles. This first course is mandatory for computer science majors. In a follow on elective course, students are presented with information on object-oriented programming, CASE tools, and Ada. GW Ada/Ed is used in the software engineering course.

Concept: Design Concepts, Object-oriented Design, Software Engineering

Audience: Employee

Background: Computer Scientist, Software Engineer/Developer, System Analyst

The U.S. Naval Academy (USNA)
Address: Computer Science Department, 572 Holloway Road, Annapolis, MD 21402, USA,
Point of Contact: Professor E.K. Park
Phone: (410) 293-6806, DSN 281-6806
Fax: (410) 293-2686


Ada Courses

Objective: The Air Force 333rd Training Squadron trains approximately 700-800 enlisted personnel in Ada programming each year. The enlisted computer programmer specialists are trained in a 6-8 week Ada course. This training is the first course in programming for most of the students, and the basics of programming using Ada are emphasized. The faculty expects to convert to Ada 9X during the 1994-1995 Academic Year. A mobile training team based at Keesler also travels to various stateside and overseas sites to teach a beginning Ada course to Air Force officer, enlisted, and civilian personnel. The mobile training team courses are targeted to people who have had previous programming experience, but have not programmed in Ada. These courses are 3 to 4 weeks in duration and cover the entire Ada language. The 333rd currently has 286 and 386 PCs running ALSYS, Meridian, and Rational Ada 83 compilers in the DOS environment. The 333rd is procuring 486s and planning to convert to Ada 9X prior to the end of 1994. The 333rd has also experimented with the GNAT Ada 9X compiler running on OS/2 on a 486.

Concept: Ada 95 Compatible Issue

Audience: Employee

Background: Computer Scientist, Software Engineer/Developer, System Analyst

Air Force, 333rd Training Squadron, Keesler AFB
Address: 333 TRS-TTCSA, 600 First St., Suite 101, Keesler AFB, MS 39534-5000, USA,
Point of Contact: Captain Larry Schwenk
Phone: (601) 377-3602, DSN 597-3602
Fax: (601) 377-4882


Apprentice Communications-Computer Systems Programming Specialist

Objective: Trains airmen to perform duties described in AFR 39-1 for computer programmers.

Concept: Abstract Data Types, Design Concepts, Exception Handling, Generics, Packages, Problem Solving, Reuse Unlisted Concept(s), Software Development Process, Software Engineering, Strong Typing

Audience: Other Audience, Student

Background: Student (attending college/university)

Computer: Unisys 386/25

Compiler: Meridian AdaVantage version 4.1

Textbook: Skansholm, J. Ada from the Beginning. Addison-Wesley, 1988. 617p. (ISBN: 0-201-17522-3; $29.25) (Required)

Community College of the Air Force (CCAF)
Address: 600 1st Street, Suite 101, 333 TRS/TTCCP, KAFB, MS 39534, USA,
Point of Contact: SrA Russell E. Hixon
Phone: (601) 377-0520
Fax: (601) 377-1252


Ada Courses

Objective: A one-week Ada course is conducted at USSTRATCOM four times a year to teach experienced civilian and military programmers the elementary features or basics of Ada. Students are almost exclusively computer programmers assigned to USSTRATCOM. Ninety percent of the students are Air Force military (E5 03) and civilians, and 10 percent of the students are Navy personnel. The Meridian Ada compiler is used on PCs.

Concept: Unlisted Lesson(s)

Audience: Employee

Background: Computer Scientist, Software Engineer/Developer, System Analyst

US STRATCOM
Address: US STRATCOM/J674, 901 SAC Blvd., Suite 2B10, Offut AFB, NE 68113-5100, USA,
Point of Contact: Capt. George McMullin
Phone: (402) 294-4222
Fax: (402) 294-4222


DACS Courses

Objective: The DACS is a DoD Information Analysis Center run by Kaman Sciences. The DACS offers high quality technical courses and e-mails potential participants of the particular courses. Contact DACS directly for course information.

Concept: Software Engineering, Unlisted Lesson(s)

Audience: Employee, General Public, Other Audience, Student

Background: Computer Scientist, Manager/Administrator, Other Background, Software Engineer/Developer, Student (attending college/university), System Analyst

Data & Analysis Center for Software
Address: c/o Kaman Sciences Corporation, 258 Genesee Street, Utica, NY 13502, USA,
Point of Contact: Anne Robinson
Phone: (315) 734-3696
Fax: (315) 734-3699


Ada Courses

Objective: Since the early 1980s when Ada was first introduced, the USMA has taught Ada to students majoring in computer science. Each year, 30-40 students graduate from the Military Academy with a bachelor's degree in computer science. Currently, Ada is taught in computer science courses that cover software design and engineering. Computer science majors are introduced to Ada in the Analysis of Programming Languages course, which they take during their junior year. This course provides an introduction to and overview of Ada, and students use the Pascal subset of Ada and Ada tasking to complete programming projects. During their senior year, students majoring in computer science take a course that introduces them to software engineering with Ada. In this course, the object oriented design method is emphasized as students explore the advanced features of Ada. Students also take a two semester software engineering design course, in which they complete a semester-long, language independent design project; typically a significant percentage of the students use Ada for this project. During the 1994-1995 academic year, the military academy plans to teach Ada on a trial basis in one section of the freshmen level Introduction to Programming course. The USMA uses SunAda, SPARCWorks Ada (both Verdix products are repackaged by Sun), and GNAT Ada 9X on a UNIX platform. The USMA just acquired the Rational Apex environment under the Rational SEED program. All these environments can be accessed via the academy wide network or directly from the workstations in the UNIX lab. In addition, GNAT on OS/2, and Meridian Ada for Windows are available from a PC lab.

Concept: Ada 95 Compatible Issue, Design Concepts, Object-oriented Design, Software Engineering, Tasking

Audience: Employee

Background: Computer Scientist, Software Engineer/Developer, System Analyst

The U.S. Military Academy (USMA)
Address: Department of EE & Computer Science, West Point, NY 10996, USA,
Point of Contact: LTC Clark Ray
Phone: (914) 938-3029, DSN 688-3029
Fax: (914) 938-5956


Ada Courses

Objective: AFIT has been teaching Ada as its primary programming language since the early 1980s. All of the core computer science courses and software engineering related courses use Ada to some extent. Ada 9X was introduced during the 1993-1994 academic year in the software systems engineering and software maintenance courses. In addition, Ada is used in a number of ongoing research projects, including a project to develop graphics simulation in Ada 9X. Each year, an average of 30 to 40 students graduate from AFIT with a masters of science degree in computer science or computer engineering. AFIT uses GNAT Ada 9X, Meridian Ada, and Rational Apex (SEED grant program) running on Sun workstations and over a network. Janus Ada is running on PCs in a networked PC lab. Students use a variety of Ada products on their PCs.

Concept: Ada 95 Compatible Issue, Software Development Process, Software Engineering

Audience: Employee

Background: Computer Scientist, Software Engineer/Developer, System Analyst

Air Force Institute of Technology (AFIT)
Address: AFIT/LSS, 2950 P. Street, Bldg. 125, Wright-Paterson AFB, OH 45433, USA,
Point of Contact: Maj. David Cook
Phone: (513) 476-4500, DSN 986-4500
Fax: (513) 476-4550


Ada Courses

Objective: The DAU trains members of the DoD who are involved in procurement. The DAU does not conduct instruction directly, but consists of a consortium of some 15 institutions that conduct acquisition training on behalf of the DAU, paid for with DAU funding. The DAU oversees and coordinates courses for 13 different acquisition related career fields, including program management, acquisition logistics, systems planning, communications, and information systems. None involve instruction at the programming language level, but some include topics related to Ada such as the instruction given to program managers (see below).

Concept: Management Overview

Audience: Employee

Background: Computer Scientist, Software Engineer/Developer, System Analyst

Defense Systems Management College (DSMC)
Address: DSMC, FD-SM, 9820 Belvoir Rd., Suite G-38, Fort Belvoir, VA 22060-5565, USA,
Point of Contact: Jim Dobbins
Phone: (703) 805-2525, DSN 655-2591


Ada Courses

Objective: DSMC trains officers and DoD civilians in acquisition management. The primary course is a five month Program Management course for PMs and PEOs. DSMC also offers a number of one week courses one of which covers Software Acquisition Management. DSMC trains acquisition managers, not programmers. Instruction covers the DoD issues affecting software acquisition. The program manager course devotes 17 hours to software management, of which one hour is dedicated to the Ada language, why it is mandated, and what benefits Ada provides. The week long software acquisition course has one block on the program management decision process that discusses the Ada mandate. A later block on software engineering decisions provides information about the Ada dual use program and available Ada resources.

Concept: Management Overview, Software Engineering

Audience: Employee

Background: Computer Scientist, Manager/Administrator, Software Engineer/Developer, System Analyst

Defense Systems Management College (DSMC)
Address: DSMC, FD-SM, 9820 Belvoir Rd., Suite G-38, Fort Belvoir, VA 22060-5565, USA,
Point of Contact: Jim Dobbins
Phone: (703) 805-2525, DSN 655-2591


Ada Courses

Objective: Approximately 50 marines who have an Ada programmer specialty (MOS 4067) receive entry-level training in Ada programming each year. In addition, a small number of marines and navy personnel, both enlisted and officer, receive advanced or progression training at this school each year. This training includes a more advanced software development course in which projects in Ada involving AdaSAGE and covering concepts of reuse are completed. Others who receive training from time to time include non commissioned officers in the data processing MOS, officers, civilians, and soldiers from other services. The Marine Corps Computer Science School runs ALSYS Ada for DOS on PCs. The school is installing a UNIX system that can be accessed via the network. The school uses AdaSAGE libraries to teach reuse with some of the Ada training.

Concept: Reuse Unlisted Concept(s), Software Development Process

Audience: Employee

Background: Computer Scientist, Software Engineer/Developer, System Analyst

Marine Corps Computer Science School
Address: 3255 Meyers Ave., Quantico, VA 22134, USA,
Point of Contact: Chief Warrant Officer June Rudd
Phone: (703) 640-2891, DSN 278-2891
Fax: (703) 784-3552