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NOTE: This memorandum is no longer in effect.



    Memorandum from the Office of the Secretary of Defense on the Use of Ada
                  Hon. Noel Longuemare, Hon. Emmett Paige, Jr.


26 August 1994

This Memorandum reiterates the DoD's commitment to the use of Ada in the
context of the Secretary of Defense's 29 June 1994 memorandum on the use
of commercial, off-the-shelf (COTS) products.


                   OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY OF DEFENSE

                       Washington, DC  20301-1000

                            August 26, 1994


MEMORANDUM FOR SECRETARIES OF THE MILITARY DEPARTMENTS
               CHAIRMAN OF THE JOINT CHIEFS OF STAFF
               UNDER SECRETARY OF DEFENSE (PERSONNEL AND
                 READINESS)
               UNDER SECRETARY OF DEFENSE (POLICY)
               COMPTROLLER OF THE DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE
               GENERAL COUNSEL OF THE DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE
               INSPECTOR GENERAL OF THE DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE
               DIRECTOR OF OPERATIONAL TEST AND EVALUATION
               DIRECTORS OF THE DEFENSE AGENCIES

SUBJECT:  Use of Ada

     The purpose of this memorandum is to reiterate the
Department of Defense (DoD) commitment to the use of Ada.

     It is DoD policy to use commercial off-the-shelf (COTS)
software whenever it meets our requirements.  However, when
COTS software is not available to satisfy requirements and the
DoD must develop unique software to meet its needs, that
software must be written in the Ada programming language in
accordance with DoD Directive 3405.1 and DoD Instruction
5000.2.

     Secretary Perry's June 29, 1994 memorandum,
"Specification & Standards -- A New Way of Doing Business,"
states that military standards will only be used "as a last
resort, with an appropriate waiver."  This direction has
caused some confusion regarding the Ada requirement since most
references to Ada cite its MIL-STD nomenclature, MIL-STD-
1815A.  Ada is also a Federal Information Processing Standard
(FIPS 119), an American National Standards Institute (ANSI)
standard (ANSI-1815A-1983), and an International Standards
Organization (ISO) standard (ISO 8652-1987).  Any of these
alternative references may be utilized in place of the MIL-STD
reference in request for proposals, contracts, and other
similar documents.  Thus, the Ada requirement does not
conflict with the Secretary's direction, and compliance with
both policies can be achieved simultaneously.

     Use of other programming languages can be considered if
proposed by a contractor as part of his best practices since
waivers to the use of Ada can be granted, where cost-
effective, in accordance with procedures established in the
policy referenced above.  However, such proposals require
strong justification to prove that the overall life-cycle cost
will be less than the use of Ada will provide.

     Secretary Perry's memorandum encourages practices that
satisfy the Department's need to build high quality systems
that meet requirements at affordable costs an in a timely
manner.  This includes practices which support the development
of Defense Software.  Ada is not only a facilitator of
software engineering best practice, but also has inherent
features which uniquely support both real-time systems and
safety-critical systems.  Use of Ada also facilitates software
reuse and has demonstrated reduced support costs.
Accordingly, Ada is a foundation for sound software
engineering practice.

/signed/                                  /signed/

Noel Longuemare                   Emmett Paige, Jr.
Under Secretary of Defense        Assistant Secretary of Defense
  (Acquisition and Technology)      (Command, Control,
  (Acting)                          Communications, and
                                    Intelligence)

cc:
DDR&E


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